L’Atalante (1934)

“What?  You closed your eyes?…Don’t you know you can see your beloved’s face in the water?…It’s true.  When I was little, I saw things like that.  And last year, I saw your face in the water.”

Could it be that simple, to just open your eyes?  Certainly not, but there is certainly something magically simple about love.  In all its frustrating complexity, it never deviates from the simple constant of feeling. Continue reading

Kane the Man

kane

Charles Foster Kane walks through the threshold of the room that was once occupied by his beautiful wife—a shrine to her celebrity, a celebrity that was as empty as it was critically panned—but now stands wrecked and uninhabited.  Through his own machinations, he had made that woman who she was; not only was her fame a product of his intrusion, but so, also, was her marriage to him.  For years they had sat on opposite sides of the vast hall, she with her jigsaw puzzles on the floor, he in his throne-like master chairs, looking at the gargantuan fireplace before him.  Were there ever two more isolated activities than those?  Now, that void had been finally realized, and she had left him—for once, a decision based on her own free will.  His behavior had brought about her departure, and he recognized his role in it.  But, he would not be undone.  He had built that shrine, he would tear it down.  And so he had.  And now, behind him, the bedroom lays a shambles: statues, trophies, linens and furniture broken, torn and scattered throughout the room. Continue reading