The 102 Greatest Movie Songs

With the recent post on The Wizard of Oz, as well as the journey we’ve been taking through movie music in the context of the year 1939 (which has included lists of the great composers, scores, and songwriters in film history), I thought that a list of the greatest movie songs is worth putting together. Continue reading

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The 30 Greatest Movie Songwriters

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As stated in my “Brief Exposition on Movie Music”, there is more to movie music than just a traditional score.  There is also the incorporation of classical place-setters and the addition of music-and-lyric type songs (whether they be original or recycled, diegetic or non-diegetic).  So, while my recent reviews on Gone With the Wind and Wuthering Heights have led me to spend some extra time on the great scores and composers of moviedom, it is still requisite that we journey through movie songs on our quest for film competence. And, considering our last two reviews of American movies from 1939 will be particularly important when it comes to this very topic, the divulgence into these lists seems all the more important.  These movies are, The Wizard of Oz and, to a lesser extent, The Roaring Twenties. So, like we did with the lists on traditional movie score, we will begin with a list on the writers of this great music.  Enjoy!

*Note: special thanks to Chow Kim Wan, a commenter, who made a couple corrections on my 1990s Disney songwriters.  There were some inaccuracies.  They have since been updated.

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The 101 Greatest Film Scores

Lists, and not baseball, have become America’s favorite pastime, and for fifteen years now, I have been passing as much time as anybody I know.   Continue reading

30 Best Film Composers

As I stated in my “Brief Exposition on Movie Music”, 1939 was one of several watershed moments in film history, not only because of the sheer amount of great films that were pumped out of Hollywood that year, but also because it introduced forever the “thematic” elements of movie scores.  In particular, the Alfred Newman’s score in Wuthering Heights and Max Steiner’s work in Gone With the Wind were key players in this movement. Continue reading

Ranking and Analyzing the Marvel Cinematic Universe (as of May 2015)

As I always do, I am taking a quick break from my current curriculum to have some fun.  With the release of Avengers: Age of Ultron a couple weeks ago, as well as the season finale of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: Season Two just days ago, I have decided to indulge myself and whomever else would like to join me as we talk Marvel.

Of course, this is the Film Sage, not Cinema Blend or ScreenCrush.  Which means that we first have to address some observations and analyses that I have made of this popular genre.  Then, I’ll try to rank the Marvel Cinematic Universe (or, MCU) for your reading pleasure.

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Cinema’s Best Trilogies

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In light of my recent review of Hiroshi Inagaki’s 3-part masterpiece, The Samurai Trilogy, I think a quick little tangent into the art of the film trilogy would be rewarding.   Continue reading

The Greatest Plot Twists in Movie History

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In light of my recent mention of the “Rosebud” plot twist in my series of essays on Citizen Kane, I think I’ll have some fun and make a list of the greatest plot twists in movie history.  But, of course, before you read my list, you have to read my ramblings about the topic at hand. Continue reading

The FilmSage’s Great Movies Video List

I’ve recently been engrossed in Roger Ebert’s published collection of essays entitled The Great Movies.  He was not a fan of lists, and this essay collection—along with his entries into the Sight and Sound poll—pretty much acted as his only dabblings in list-making.  The “great movies” of Ebert’s selection consisted of about 360 or so films ranging from Giovanni Pastrone’s 1914 silent epic Cabiria and ending with 2008’s beautifully quaint Japanese masterpiece from Yōjirō Takita, Departures.  These essays, therefore, were not meant to act as a cool countdown list; they were not even supposed to be comprehensive—there were a lot of great movies that Ebert didn’t write about (though he likely would have if he hadn’t passed away).  This collection, was instead to act as a tour, as it were, through the staples of a truly competent movie-connoisseur.

I have also compiled a list.  Continue reading

“There’s Nothing Good on Netflix”…or is there?

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Before I continue with my series of essays on Citizen Kane (i.e. the best movie I’ve ever seen, and probably will ever see), I must respect the wishes of a few people who have made a special request.  I always play requests, even if that means I delay whatever plans I may have had for a post or a page.  That is, I will always play requests until that time that this blog actually gains a real following and I won’t be able to keep up with the demand.  But, until that time, bring ’em on. Continue reading

350 Greatest Movie Quotes

(This list, like all lists in this blog is regularly updated when I feel it is necessary).

I like to release a fun little list in conjunction with my new posts and pages.  I think it’s time I put up a new one, especially considering the fact that I didn’t have such a list for that mammoth publication on montage theory I did.  Now, considering the emphasis I placed on wit and dialogue in my “My Take On…Comedy” page, I felt it would be appropriate to list the greatest movie quotes of all time.  Most of these are comedic in that they are funny, satirical, witty, or sarcastic—as a matter of fact, they’re all at least witty (though some are far from funny).  That is good enough reason to publish this list in conjunction with an analysis on comedy. Continue reading